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2021 (??) CFL Season


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all things considered we had a pretty good regular season...Prior to Nichols injury we were rolling...Defence was lights out and barely allowing TD's Nichols went down...Strev was up and down and

One good thing about the Nichols move to Ottawa for me: we were not supposed to play the Argos at home this year due to the imbalanced schedule. At least now when the RedBlacks show up Oct. 2 the club

$404K in 2021, $500K in 2022. And hopefully more of this:

Boomers don't have to prove anything to anyone....never have ..never will...Speaking for my generation ,a lot of us were born to vets. from a world war....much bigger than this pandemic....The children born to PTSD veterans of that war carried a heavy load in the initial part of their lives....Looking back most of  us have done well considering ...This pandemic will end....most will survive...including boomers....In the end and at present it starts with getting a vaccination...encouraging others to get it definitely helps

AND ...our music is and was better than that rap crap

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1 hour ago, Mark F said:

also, our (boomer) music is much superior to theirs. their music is crap and they should be ashamed for thinking its any good. 

what generation are the idiots I always see driving giant pickups with one person in it to get a coffee at 7/11?

with the truck running with air con on while they go in the store. look like thirty year olds.

generation dumb.

chopping down the ladder, selfish stupid idiots.

 

Yes, please let's talk boomer music. 

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1 hour ago, Jpan85 said:

 

I was intrigued by a Yoshi quote from the other day saying that he doesn't want to get the vaxx (yeeeeeeesh...) but if it was the only way he could come to Canada and play, then you could stick him with it 8 times....whatever it takes to play, he's in. 

 

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7 hours ago, Stickem said:

Boomers don't have to prove anything to anyone....never have ..never will...Speaking for my generation ,a lot of us were born to vets. from a world war....much bigger than this pandemic....The children born to PTSD veterans of that war carried a heavy load in the initial part of their lives....Looking back most of  us have done well considering ...This pandemic will end....most will survive...including boomers....In the end and at present it starts with getting a vaccination...encouraging others to get it definitely helps

AND ...our music is and was better than that rap crap

My Dad & six uncles fought in WW2. My Mom didn't see my father for nearly 5 years. My oldest brother was born when he was away. I never heard my Mother bitching or complaining ever about having to be a single Mom in a World War not knowing if my Dad would ever return. They put up with shortages, rationing & life was not easy. I can't imagine the stress (that lasted for years) these women were under at the time. These alt right conservatives & entitled snowflakes today crying about a conspiracy with vaccines & how their rights have been taken away forced to wear masks with restrictions can go **** off.

Oh yeah, my father was an alcoholic. A quiet man with a loving family but much preferred being drunk to being sober. Was it from the War? I don't know as it was never discussed in our house & my Dad never sought treatment but he obviously was in pain. So yes, Stickem, those soldiers carried a heavy load. 

Edited by SpeedFlex27
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Back then, they called PTSS "shell-shock" and alcohol became the usual self-medication for too many to help them live with the memories of the horrors and fears they lived with.  In the US, more military have committed suicide than have died in all the foreign wars. For many, booze was only a brief respite and then they passed the trauma down to their sons and daughters. Now, there are effective treatments for those who are brave enough to seek help. For every untreated PTSS sufferer, there are 5-6 people (parents, siblings, partners and children) affected.

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2 hours ago, Tracker said:

Back then, they called PTSS "shell-shock" and alcohol became the usual self-medication for too many to help them live with the memories of the horrors and fears they lived with.  In the US, more military have committed suicide than have died in all the foreign wars. For many, booze was only a brief respite and then they passed the trauma down to their sons and daughters. Now, there are effective treatments for those who are brave enough to seek help. For every untreated PTSS sufferer, there are 5-6 people (parents, siblings, partners and children) affected.

Yep. They were expected to suck it up. 

Edited by SpeedFlex27
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My father turned to booze also...He was R.C.A.F. in the Battle of Britain from 39' on....I know what he saw and endured was most likely the cause of his alcoholism ...ruined the family and his life....Did we cry and give up ...NO....we sucked it up and survived.....Our neighbours at the time said he was termed .shell shocked' ...the term is now PTSD...BUT nobody ,especially govt. wanted to recognize it....This pandemic is a war of sorts....but nothing compared to the 60 million lives lost in that catastrophe...the second world war.....Life goes on

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5 hours ago, Stickem said:

My father turned to booze also...He was R.C.A.F. in the Battle of Britain from 39' on....I know what he saw and endured was most likely the cause of his alcoholism ...ruined the family and his life....Did we cry and give up ...NO....we sucked it up and survived.....Our neighbours at the time said he was termed .shell shocked' ...the term is now PTSD...BUT nobody ,especially govt. wanted to recognize it....This pandemic is a war of sorts....but nothing compared to the 60 million lives lost in that catastrophe...the second world war.....Life goes on

And today people ***** about having to wear masks as if their lives are ruined... 

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Governments have the right to order you to go to France Live in a trench up to your knees in fetid water, surrounded by dead comrades and horses and crawling with millions of rats while constantly being pounded by artillery . Then climb out of that muck hole and run straight at a machine gun. But apparently in the mind of some they can't make you wear a mask or get a little prick in the arm. My great uncle that died like that, and my other great uncle that lived like that at 14 years old would have something to say to them. As would my uncle who burned to death in a bomber 25 years later.  Yet we have all these people who think wearing a mask to to big of a sacrifice to make.  It makes me sick.

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On 2021-04-24 at 8:08 AM, Stickem said:

My father turned to booze also...He was R.C.A.F. in the Battle of Britain from 39' on....I know what he saw and endured was most likely the cause of his alcoholism ...ruined the family and his life..

my childhood friend same thing with his father...

 father was a pilot in ww2... became an utter wreck alcoholic. my friend never recovered. nice person, smart, handsome,  and ruined.

 

Edited by Mark F
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3 hours ago, Mark F said:

my childhood friend same thing with his father...

 father was a pilot in ww2... became an utter wreck alcoholic. my friend never recovered. nice person, smart, handsome,  and ruined.

 

My father & a couple of his brothers came back from the war alcoholics. Yeah if it wasn't for my Mother our family would have split apart. She held it together. Even though my Dad would disappear for days & we didn't know if he was alive or dead.

When I was little, I remember the arguments they had & how she would threaten to leave him & how freaked out I used to get when I heard that. I worried about that a lot as that was said all the time.

As I got into my teenage years it didn't bother me anymore. I used to disrespect my father any chance I could. I'd always throw his alcoholism in his face when he tried to discipline me. For example, when I was in grade 11, I had a few drinks & came home from a party at about 4 am. My dad said that was unacceptable & not to do it again. I just looked at him & said, "You mean like you do all the time?" He had nothing to say & just left the room. I just smirked & laughed to myself thinking how clever I was. I did that to him a lot as a teen acting out my frustrations. I was angry & I have carried that anger with me my entire life although I deal with it better than I did when I was younger.

Some of you here have experienced first hand that anger & for that I'm sorry. I am trying to do better. Thank God, I never became a violent partner in my marriage of 36 years. I've never laid a finger on my wife or had the thought ever crossed my mind. For which I'm eternally grateful having grown up in that looney tunes house of mine. Things could have gone bad in my life but they never did. 

Edited by SpeedFlex27
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Back on topic, Our Man Tait has another really great "First And 10" at BB.com...

https://www.bluebombers.com/2021/04/25/first-10-jeffcoat-neufeld-optimistic-hopeful/

This but in particular is worth checking out the whole piece... 

A couple of leftovers from Bombers President and CEO Wade Miller from my interview with him earlier in the week.

First, I asked him about the suggestion the CFL should just go dark for another year and simply regroup for 2022. There was a pause before he answered, and when he did there was a sense that, if he could, he would have reached out and slapped me upside the head for even bringing that up.

“That,” he said, “is NOT an option. We’re playing football and we need to play football. We need to play football for our players, our coaches and our fans.”

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20 hours ago, Mark F said:

my childhood friend same thing with his father...

 father was a pilot in ww2... became an utter wreck alcoholic. my friend never recovered. nice person, smart, handsome,  and ruined.

 

There are more tragedies that most likely never came to light after that war....Your friends father sounds like a repeat of mine.....Post war my dad worked for the federal govt.    ran a dept. in the Unemployment Insurance office in Wpg. for years until the booze finally caught up....Our family really took a hit and ended up in emergency housing  (Flora Place) when I was a kid....It was tough for my brothers and sisters to come out of that but we managed....It was easy to feel sorry for ourselves but we didn't...It's tough for me to even talk about those days and I can imagine what some families are going through now with this pandemic...Losing everything is tough but we keep on going...Hard life lessons are being learned now....BUT it well end....as that war did, and like I said before life goes on...................Back to football

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To validate what some have shared here: the father of a good friend served on the bomber crew that flew the most missions over Germany in WW2. Every one of the air crew turned to alcohol to anesthetize the memories and associated feelings and this produced a horrible childhood for my friend and his siblings all of whom succumbed to addiction as well. They were the walking wounded and far from few.

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Friend of mines Uncle was in the air force during WW2. Ironically he got sick with the German measels which prevented him from flying. His entire squadron got shot down while he was sick.

He drank every day...alcoholic. He never spoke much about war.

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