Jump to content

Covid-19


JCon
 Share

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, SpeedFlex27 said:

Why are we even discussing this country?

What bothers me is that video is more than a week old. The stats are off and deaths are much more than what they’re saying on the video. 
We will have to wait and see if the cases flatten out in their model, but for now their death rate is one of the highest.

They rank 14th (899) in the number of deaths in the world despite having only 10,483 cases (20th in the world)

(updated April 13, 1:25 GMT)

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/?#countries

 

 

Edited by Mr Dee
Link to comment
Share on other sites

According to a report from the Daily Beast, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar may soon be exiting the White House for refusing to sugarcoat information about the coronavirus pandemic when speaking with Donald Trump.

Azar, who attempted to alert the president about the looming COVID-19 pandemic threat in January, has rarely been invited to the president’s daily coronavirus press briefings which could be a sign that his days are numbered

As longtime political observer Eleanor Clift writes, after describing Azar as one possible “hero” in the White House: “Speaking truth to power has its price in the Trump administration. The former Eli Lilly executive was shouted down by White House aides as ‘alarmist’ and sidelined by Jared Kushner, Mike Pence and others willing to give the president a more rosy view. And on Sunday night, Trump lashed out at Azar by name for the first time, following New York Times report that Azar had ‘directly warned Mr. Trump of the possibility of a pandemic during a call on Jan. 30, the second warning he delivered to the president about the virus in two weeks.’”

According to Clift, “After complaining about ‘mayhem’ at the White House, Azar’s future is uncertain but his attempts to get top officials and President Trump to pay attention to the coming pandemic should not be lost in the fog of war as Trump recasts history in his favor.”

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for The Big Story newsletter to receive stories like this one in your inbox.

In the wake of President Trump’s move to push aside the official who was supposed to lead the coronavirus bailout watchdog group, four other members are just as vulnerable.

Trump was able to remove the panel’s chosen head, Glenn Fine, by naming a new Defense Department inspector general and bumping Fine to the No. 2 job at the Pentagon watchdog office. No longer an acting inspector general, Fine was disqualified from serving on the panel he was supposed to lead.

Fine’s removal sounded an alarm among Democrats in Congress, who had demanded that spending safeguards be built into the $2 trillion recovery package. House Democrats rushed out a proposed tweak that would stop further removals like Fine’s by opening up eligibility to senior officials in IG offices, not just IGs themselves.

“We must not allow President Trump to openly flout the oversight measures that Congress put in place,” Oversight Committee Chairwoman Carolyn Maloney, along with Reps. Gerald Connolly and Stephen Lynch, said in a statement on Wednesday. “There are literally trillions of taxpayer dollars at stake, and Americans across the political spectrum want those funds to be spent without waste, fraud, abuse, or profiteering.”

The four other members of the Pandemic Response Accountability Committee who serve in an acting capacity are Mitchell Behm at the Department of Transportation, Sandra Bruce at Education, Richard Delmar at Treasury and Christi Grimm at Health and Human Services. That means they could also be removed by being replaced, just as Fine was.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, AtlanticRiderFan said:

And Sweden has more cases per capita than we do, and they have more ACTUAL deaths than we do. More deaths for country with a quarter of our population is a lot. Sweden is not a good model for fighting COVID.

In the video he said that Denmark, Sweden's neighbour, went into full lockdown mode, like us, and is experiencing about the same death rate as Sweden. If that's true, then what's the point of a lockdown? Add to that the fact that Sweden hasn't "cratered" their economy and the strategy makes sense. Their approach is to take the brunt of it now and get it over with instead of prolonging the pain and suffering of a protracted lockdown. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, J5V said:

In the video he said that Denmark, Sweden's neighbour, went into full lockdown mode, like us, and is experiencing about the same death rate as Sweden. If that's true, then what's the point of a lockdown? Add to that the fact that Sweden hasn't "cratered" their economy and the strategy makes sense. Their approach is to take the brunt of it now and get it over with instead of prolonging the pain and suffering of a protracted lockdown. 

A nice, neat argument - until you look at what Norway has achieved. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Mark H. said:

A nice, neat argument - until you look at what Norway has achieved. 

Norway, like Korea, has really low numbers as they locked down almost immediately. Their fear is that when they relax the restrictions they will experience a spike in infections and away we go again. This is exactly what has happened in places like China. So the question may become, do we have a long, drawn out battle with this thing which destroys our economy and leads to mass social problems, or do we bite the bullet now, save the economy, avoid the social problems and get it over with? It remains to be seen which approach is best.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, J5V said:

In the video he said that Denmark, Sweden's neighbour, went into full lockdown mode, like us, and is experiencing about the same death rate as Sweden. If that's true, then what's the point of a lockdown? Add to that the fact that Sweden hasn't "cratered" their economy and the strategy makes sense. Their approach is to take the brunt of it now and get it over with instead of prolonging the pain and suffering of a protracted lockdown. 

Denmark has a much lower death rate but also a much lower population density

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, J5V said:

Norway, like Korea, has really low numbers as they locked down almost immediately. Their fear is that when they relax the restrictions they will experience a spike in infections and away we go again. This is exactly what has happened in places like China. So the question may become, do we have a long, drawn out battle with this thing which destroys our economy and leads to mass social problems, or do we bite the bullet now, save the economy, avoid the social problems and get it over with? It remains to be seen which approach is best.

Korea didn't lock down...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are now one week at an infection rate of under 10% - last two days are five per cent

If you eliminate long-term care homes, there is almost no spread of covid 

We do not need to keep increasing controls on our freedoms - the basic lockdown had immediate effects, we need to look at a strategy to protect seniors and open society again by the end of this month

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, bustamente said:

Dumbass Trump thinks he can wave his magic wand re open businesses ....................he can't, and he can't fire Dr. Fauci either, what he can see if that his ratings are dropping as President and the way he is handling the pandemic

They have dropped a bit but sadly they are still higher than most of his presidency

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Jpan85 pinned and unpinned this topic

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...