Jump to content

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, WildPath said:

Manitoba Nurses has been a good follow. They've exposed the lie about hiring 60 more ICU nurses. Unfortunately you just can't trust the announcements they make.

One of the saddest things about the response by the government is the misinformation and blaming others/not accepting any responsibility - "We've got this. Doctors are trying to create chaos". When media report on their transgressions they are labelled as biased/fake news (pretty scary considering what that's led to down south) and used as a means of fundraising to fight the evil media.

There's definitely a lot of blame to be carried on the shoulders of those resisting restrictions/masks/vaccinations - I would be much more comfortable if they would just choose one of the three to resist. Morden/Winkler area reporting between 0-20% vaccinated - its just a hair over 10% to be exact (the big white spot on the map). The Southern region altogether has 20% lower vaccination rates than every other area. https://www.gov.mb.ca/covid19/vaccine/reports.html

The PCs really need to accept a large amount of the blame rather than using the pandemic as an smoke screen to introduce really bad legislation. They started a campaign to attract tourism, actually paid money, in the middle of a pandemic, to attract tourism and large events. When that eventually bit us in the ass (somehow they assumed Manitoba was immune despite trying to attract tourism from surrounding hotspots) they refused to do hiring to do adequate contract tracing and suggest Manitobans need to volunteer to help out.

Now we've been bit again despite having the good fortune of having our waves delayed compared to every area in Canada/US. We have not heeded warnings from medical professionals. A little foresight and planning ahead could mitigate more restrictive measures. Instead of actually planning ahead, like having a whole year to increase ICU capacity instead of doing victory laps, we're left asking for help from "the evil feds", Ontario, Saskatchewan and North Dakota. Its a really bad look on a government that has disdain for anyone who accepts EI or other forms of social assistance.

If you are expecting the Tories and/or Pallister to accept responsibility for the pandemic mishandling and avoidable deaths, you will be waiting for a looong time. The usual tactics are to deny, deflect, claim unavoidability and when the crisis is over, to say that its over, so no point in bringing it up again.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 8.8k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I am a teacher and also immunocompromised. I got my first shot this week. It was neither being a teacher, nor having an autoimmune disease that qualified me to be vaccinated. My autoimmune condition p

Any further posts from confirmed conspiracy sources will be removed. 

This will be the first year that I will be unable to spend the winter in Costa Rica due to COVID. All the other winters I didn't go because I couldn't afford to.

15 hours ago, FrostyWinnipeg said:

No way to know how legit this poster is, but a lot of things lined up in their favour yesterday.  

https://www.reddit.com/r/Winnipeg/comments/nlhhdk/chaos_inside_the_pcs/

 

Edited by Wideleft
Link to post
Share on other sites

Faster than a PCR test: dogs detect Covid in under a second

Faster than PCR and more accurate than lateral flow tests, the latest weapons against Covid-19 have four legs and a wet nose.

A study published on Monday found that people who are infected with coronavirus give off a distinct odour, which these highly trained dogs can detect with pinpoint precision.

Tala, a golden Labrador in a red work jacket, greets me with a cursory sniff, before returning to his handler. I’m relieved to have passed the test, but feel a wet train of mucus on my hand where I petted him. This mucus fulfils an important purpose: dissolving odour molecules from the air and transporting them to olfactory receptors in the top of their nose, where the magic happens. Whereas humans have about 5m of these receptors, dogs have up to 300m.

Dr Claire Guest has always been fascinated by dogs, and humans’ relationship with them. After studying psychology, she worked for Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, where she met a woman who said her pet Dalmatian had diagnosed a malignant melanoma on her calf. “She kept saying, ‘The dog sniffed it,’” Guest recalled. In 2002, Guest joined forces with an orthopaedic surgeon, John Church, to test whether dogs could be trained to distinguish between urine from healthy people and those with bladder cancer. The research, published in the BMJ, showed that they could.
Medical Detection Dogs was formed in 2008. The charity trains companion dogs that can detect odour changes in people with type 1 diabetes and other severe disorders, emitted shortly before their health deteriorates, alerting them to take action. It also researches dogs’ abilities to detect cancers, and other diseases, including Parkinson’s. When the pandemic hit it had just completed a study with the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), demonstrating that dogs can detect malaria.

Tala is one of six dogs who took part in the Covid study, which has not yet been peer-reviewed. It found that dogs could detect Covid-19 on clothing worn by infected people with up to 94.3% sensitivity: they would correctly identify 94 out of every 100 infected people. This compares with a sensitivity of 58-77% for lateral flow tests, and 97.2% for PCR tests.

However, dogs beat PCR tests on speed, making a diagnosis in under a second. “This includes people who are asymptomatic and also people with a low viral load,” said Prof James Logan of LSHTM, who co-led the study.

Tala was the most accurate sniffer, achieving 94.5% sensitivity, and a specificity of 92% – the proportion of uninfected people that he would correctly identify.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Anti-vaccine movements shift their target to the vaccinated.  Anti-vaccine conspiracy theorists are blaming vaccinated people for "shedding" virus in their presence

Myths around infertility, pregnancy and miscarriages have run rampant in anti-vaccine circles for years — and in the universe of their conspiracy theories, vaccines are often to blame. While variations of such false claims have been part of misinformation campaigns around the COVID-19 vaccines, there has recently been a shift from demonizing the vaccine itself to villainizing those who are vaccinated.

It's a peculiar repositioning for the anti-vaccination conspiracy movement — and as the false claim evolves into more extreme iterations, it has caught the attention of people who study and advocate against vaccine misinformation.

"I think it is particularly interesting that people are saying that those who are those who are vaccinated are a risk to those who aren't," said David Broniatowski, who's the associate director for the Institute for Data, Democracy & Politics at George Washington University. "It's like taking the common vaccine conventional wisdom and flipping it on its head where people will say, 'if you have not been vaccinated, you're a risk to those who are more vulnerable and vaccinated.'"

Broniatowski said he's never seen this before in the history of anti-vaccine rhetoric.

"This is the first time," Broniatowski said.

The conspiracy centers on one particular myth that people who are vaccinated can emit contagious particles of the coronavirus's Spike protein and can infect others, a process referred to as "vaccine shedding." Vaccine shedding is a very rare possibility with live-attenuated vaccines that use a diluted version of a disease to stimulate an immune response. In the rare case there's enough germ to spread, the shedding usually happens via feces— for example, with the polio vaccine or the measles vaccine.

"For the measles vaccine, later in life — and again this is super rare — it's possible that the live virus could revert to a condition called Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE)," said Dr. Monica Gandhi, infectious disease doctor and professor of medicine at the University of California–San Francisco. "But in no way can you shed it and give it to someone."

Anti-vaccine movements shift their target to the vaccinated | Salon.com

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Tracker said:

Anti-vaccine movements shift their target to the vaccinated.  Anti-vaccine conspiracy theorists are blaming vaccinated people for "shedding" virus in their presence

Myths around infertility, pregnancy and miscarriages have run rampant in anti-vaccine circles for years — and in the universe of their conspiracy theories, vaccines are often to blame. While variations of such false claims have been part of misinformation campaigns around the COVID-19 vaccines, there has recently been a shift from demonizing the vaccine itself to villainizing those who are vaccinated.

It's a peculiar repositioning for the anti-vaccination conspiracy movement — and as the false claim evolves into more extreme iterations, it has caught the attention of people who study and advocate against vaccine misinformation.

"I think it is particularly interesting that people are saying that those who are those who are vaccinated are a risk to those who aren't," said David Broniatowski, who's the associate director for the Institute for Data, Democracy & Politics at George Washington University. "It's like taking the common vaccine conventional wisdom and flipping it on its head where people will say, 'if you have not been vaccinated, you're a risk to those who are more vulnerable and vaccinated.'"

Broniatowski said he's never seen this before in the history of anti-vaccine rhetoric.

"This is the first time," Broniatowski said.

The conspiracy centers on one particular myth that people who are vaccinated can emit contagious particles of the coronavirus's Spike protein and can infect others, a process referred to as "vaccine shedding." Vaccine shedding is a very rare possibility with live-attenuated vaccines that use a diluted version of a disease to stimulate an immune response. In the rare case there's enough germ to spread, the shedding usually happens via feces— for example, with the polio vaccine or the measles vaccine.

"For the measles vaccine, later in life — and again this is super rare — it's possible that the live virus could revert to a condition called Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE)," said Dr. Monica Gandhi, infectious disease doctor and professor of medicine at the University of California–San Francisco. "But in no way can you shed it and give it to someone."

Anti-vaccine movements shift their target to the vaccinated | Salon.com

Only the dumbest people. Truly astounding in their stupidity. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, JCon said:

Only the dumbest people. Truly astounding in their stupidity. 

It seems the Anti-vaxxers have painted themselves into such a tight corner that they can no longer admit they were/are wrong without conceding that they have been complete idiots being led by idiots. Therefore, they will dwindle down in numbers until only the most brain-dead remain, much as the flat-Earthers. 

18 hours ago, Tracker said:

Me too, dammit. Still no priority for ED sufferers.

Forgot to mention: there was a very effective medication for ED that is no longer available- "Micoxaphlopin".

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...