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2021 (??) CFL Season


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29 minutes ago, bryan35 said:

Friend of mines Uncle was in the air force during WW2. Ironically he got sick with the German measels which prevented him from flying. His entire squadron got shot down while he was sick.

He drank every day...alcoholic. He never spoke much about war.

My Dad & uncles were the same. No one talked about the war. No one asked either. Kinda taboo without saying it. 

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all things considered we had a pretty good regular season...Prior to Nichols injury we were rolling...Defence was lights out and barely allowing TD's Nichols went down...Strev was up and down and

$404K in 2021, $500K in 2022. And hopefully more of this:

One good thing about the Nichols move to Ottawa for me: we were not supposed to play the Argos at home this year due to the imbalanced schedule. At least now when the RedBlacks show up Oct. 2 the club

17 hours ago, Tracker said:

To validate what some have shared here: the father of a good friend served on the bomber crew that flew the most missions over Germany in WW2. Every one of the air crew turned to alcohol to anesthetize the memories and associated feelings and this produced a horrible childhood for my friend and his siblings all of whom succumbed to addiction as well. They were the walking wounded and far from few.

The children of these vet. heroes (I call them all heroes for their dedication to the country) were subjected to the same 'shell shock' (PTSD they call it now)...The offspring carry the same traits as their fathers, another fact that govt. fails to recognize...I know my mother went through hell and for a young woman carried a heavy burden for a lot of years...War ruins and take lives, more than we care to admit 

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37 minutes ago, Stickem said:

The children of these vet. heroes (I call them all heroes for their dedication to the country) were subjected to the same 'shell shock' (PTSD they call it now)...The offspring carry the same traits as their fathers, another fact that govt. fails to recognize...I know my mother went through hell and for a young woman carried a heavy burden for a lot of years...War ruins and take lives, more than we care to admit 

This is going a bot off-topic, but someone proposed that if a country is thinking of going to war, it should be under three conditions:

All of the politicians who vote for a war will have the names of 10 of their closest friends/family put into a draw where 1 of these 10 will be drafted and sent to front-line positions,

All citizens and corporations will have a visible "war tax" put onto their income statements and,

No corporation would be allowed to make profit on the war and must supply all goods and services at cost. 

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Thanks to Noeller & 17 to 85 for starting this side tracked conversation about fathers with PTSD leading to alcoholism from WW2 when they started talking about generations. I honestly thought I was the only one who suffered thru something like this when I was young. It's comforting to know some of you understand.  Just as I understand what you have been through.

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16 hours ago, SpeedFlex27 said:

Thanks to Noeller & 17 to 85 for starting this side tracked conversation about fathers with PTSD leading to alcoholism from WW2 when they started talking about generations. I honestly thought I was the only one who suffered thru something like this when I was young. It's comforting to know some of you understand.  Just as I understand what you have been through.

There's so many who can relate. I'm a grandson to a ww2 vet. And my dad has similar stories to what was shared here. My grandfather never talked about the war, turned to alcohol (for many reasons but it started when he got back) and his relationships suffered. This also had an impact on my relationship with my father (as I'm sure it has for many people). 

It wasn't until I was an adult that these things were discussed openly. But because they were I understand that some of the things my dad said or did aren't conductive to a healthy relationship between father and son, but it was what he knew...it was what he was exposed to. Knowing more, I have been able to adapt my fathering style to my kids. Likewise as he's gotten older, he's become much more emotionally available especially when grand kids arrived. He's said on multiple occasions, that he feels so lucky to have them because he can try to make up for the mistakes he made raising us.

These discussions are extremely important to help break these cycles trauma can create. 

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5 hours ago, Bigblue204 said:

There's so many who can relate. I'm a grandson to a ww2 vet. And my dad has similar stories to what was shared here. My grandfather never talked about the war, turned to alcohol (for many reasons but it started when he got back) and his relationships suffered. This also had an impact on my relationship with my father (as I'm sure it has for many people). 

It wasn't until I was an adult that these things were discussed openly. But because they were I understand that some of the things my dad said or did aren't conductive to a healthy relationship between father and son, but it was what he knew...it was what he was exposed to. Knowing more, I have been able to adapt my fathering style to my kids. Likewise as he's gotten older, he's become much more emotionally available especially when grand kids arrived. He's said on multiple occasions, that he feels so lucky to have them because he can try to make up for the mistakes he made raising us.

These discussions are extremely important to help break these cycles trauma can create. 

Hurt people hurt people. There are four non-negotiable steps to change and healing: awareness, closure, modeling of new behaviours and integration.

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