Jump to content

Space is the Place


Atomic
 Share

Recommended Posts

https://www.space.com/proxima-centauri-third-exoplanet-candidate

Quote

The sun's nearest neighbor may actually host three planets, a new study reports.

Astronomers have found evidence of a third planet circling Proxima Centauri, a red dwarf star that lies a mere 4.2 light-years from our solar system. The candidate world, known as Proxima d, is estimated to be just 25% as massive as Earth, making it one of the lightest known exoplanets if it ends up being confirmed.

artist impression:

This artist's impression shows a close-up view of Proxima d, a planet candidate recently found orbiting the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri, the closest star to our solar system. The planet is believed to be rocky and to have a mass about a quarter that of Earth. Two other planets known to orbit Proxima Centauri are visible in the image, too: Proxima b, a planet with about the same mass as Earth that orbits the star every 11 days and is within the habitable zone, and candidate Proxima c, which is on a five-year orbit around the star.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://www.space.com/james-webb-space-telescope-locks-first-star

Quote

The James Webb Space Telescope's key pointing instrument is working well in testing, according to two space agencies involved with the observatory's commissioning work.

The Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS), a contribution from Honeywell on behalf of the Canadian Space Agency, successfully  "locked on" to a specific guide star in tracking mode on Sunday (Feb. 13), the CSA reported Thursday (Feb. 17).

With FGS working well so far, the instrument will next be used to assist with the ongoing alignment of the 18 hexagonal segments that make up the primary mirror of the telescope, the CSA added. Last week, Webb engineers released a first image of a single star showing many separate views from the different mirror segments, which was expected since alignment is ongoing.

"In the coming weeks, with the help of the FGS, each mirror segment will be carefully adjusted to 'stack' these [individual segment] views and calibrate the rest of the telescope's optical elements, to ultimately create a highly focused image of a single star," the CSA said.

What an incredible feat of technology. I can't wait to see the images produced.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

https://www.cbc.ca/news/science/exomars-delay-1.6388123

Quote

Because of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Europe will no longer be attempting this year to send its first rover to Mars, which was to have probed whether the planet ever hosted life.

The European Space Agency confirmed Thursday that it's indefinitely suspending its ExoMars rover mission with partner Roscosmos, Russia's state space corporation.

ESA had previously said that the mission was "very unlikely" because of Russia's war against Ukraine.

The decision to suspend cooperation with Roscosmos was taken by ESA's ruling council, at a meeting this week in Paris.

"We deeply deplore the human casualties and tragic consequences of the aggression towards Ukraine," an ESA statement said. "While recognizing the impact on scientific exploration of space, ESA is fully aligned with the sanctions imposed on Russia by its member states."

Because of their respective orbits around the Sun, Mars is only readily reachable from Earth every two years. The next launch window would be 2024.

Goddammit, Russia.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, blue_gold_84 said:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-meteor-second-night-in-a-row-1.6396058

Anyone catch this last night? Happened around 9:45pm and was reportedly very bright.

Yes!  I just happened to be walking North in my neighbourhood at 9:45 and did see it through the neighbour's large oak tree.  It looked orange to me, but my eyeglass prescription and lens coatings can do weird things to light if I'm not looking directly at a light source.

So quick, I wasn't sure what I saw.  Asked on twitter if anyone else saw it and got a few "me too's".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://www.cbc.ca/news/science/hubble-telescope-farthest-star-1.6402889

Quote

Astronomers have discovered the farthest star yet, a super-hot, super-bright giant that formed nearly 13 billion years ago at the dawn of the cosmos.

But this luminous blue star is long gone, so massive that it almost certainly exploded into bits just a few million years after emerging. Its swift demise makes it all the more incredible that an international team spotted it with observations by the Hubble Space Telescope. It takes eons for light emitted from distant stars to reach us.

"We're seeing the star as it was about 12.8 billion years ago, which puts it about 900 million years after the Big Bang," said astronomer Brian Welch, a doctoral student at Johns Hopkins University and lead author of the study appearing in the journal Nature on Wednesday.

"We definitely just got lucky."

He nicknamed it Earendel, an Old English name that means morning star or rising light — "a fitting name for a star that we have observed in a time often referred to as `Cosmic Dawn.'"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

https://www.livescience.com/first-interstellar-object-detected

Quote

A fireball that blazed through the skies over Papua New Guinea in 2014 was actually a fast-moving object from another star system, according to a recent memo(opens in new tab) released by the U.S. Space Command (USSC).

The object, a small meteorite measuring just 1.5 feet (0.45 meter) across, slammed into Earth's atmosphere on Jan. 8, 2014, after traveling through space at more than 130,000 mph (210,000 km/h) — a speed that far exceeds the average velocity of meteors that orbit within the solar system, according to a 2019 study of the object published in the preprint database arXiv.

That 2019 study argued that the wee meteor's speed, along with the trajectory of its orbit, proved with 99% certainty that the object had originated far beyond our solar system — possibly "from the deep interior of a planetary system or a star in the thick disk of the Milky Way galaxy," the authors wrote. But despite their near certainty, the team's paper was never peer-reviewed or published in a scientific journal, as some of the data needed to verify their calculations was considered classified by the U.S. government...

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

https://www.cbc.ca/news/science/james-webb-telescope-images-1.6447622

Quote

NASA's new space telescope is in the home stretch of testing, with science observations expected to begin in July, astronomers said Monday.

The James Webb Space Telescope beamed back the latest test pictures of a neighbouring satellite galaxy, and the results are stunning when compared with images taken by NASA's previous infrared observatory, the Spitzer Space Telescope.

Each of the 18 mirror segments on the new telescope is bigger than the single one on Spitzer.

 

Launched last December, the $10 billion US ($13 billion Cdn) Webb is the largest and most powerful astronomical observatory ever sent into space. It will seek light emitted by the first stars and galaxies close to 14 billion years ago, and keep a sharp lookout for possible signs of life.

Scientists are keeping the identity of Webb's first official target a secret.

nasa-space-telescope.jpg

Amazing. Simply amazing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
5 hours ago, bigg jay said:

Hopefully they were purchased at Costco - they take anything back, regardless of the condition!

But they are probably not still in the original packaging.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...