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TrueBlue4ever

The MBB All-Time Blue Bomber team: Offensive Line - Guard

The MBB All-time Blue Bomber Team: Offensive Line - Guard  

20 members have voted

This poll is closed to new votes
  1. 1. Who are the greatest offensive guards in Blue Bomber history? (choose 2)

    • Nick Bastaja
      15
    • David Black
      8
    • Travis Bond
      1
    • Buddy Brown
      0
    • Larry Butler
      1
    • Bill Ceretti
      2
    • Ed Kotowich
      1
    • Brendan LaBatte
      1
    • Les Lear
      0
    • Bob Lueck
      1
    • Brett MacNeil
      3
    • Lou Mogul
      0
    • Steve Patrick
      3
    • Cornel Piper
      0
    • Matt Sheridan
      1
    • Sherwyn Thorson
      0

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  • Poll closed on 03/23/19 at 04:59 AM

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Choose two. Here are the bios:

CFL all-stars first awarded in 1962.

Most Outstanding Lineman first awarded in 1956 and included defensive linemen, Most Outstanding Offensive Lineman first awarded in 1974.

 

Nick Bastaja – 143 games in 9 seasons (1980-88), 6 time divisional all-star (1981, 82, 84, 85, 87, 88) and 2 time CFL all-star (1984, 85), 4 time team nominee Most Outstanding Offensive Lineman (1979, 82-84), Western Division Most Outstanding Offensive Lineman (1983), CFL Most Outstanding Offensive Lineman (1985), 2 Grey Cup appearances (1984, 88), 2 time Grey Cup champion (1984, 88)

David Black – 166 games in 11 seasons (1985-95), 3 time divisional all-star (1989, 93, 94) and CFL all-star (1993), 4 Grey Cup appearances (1988, 90, 92, 93), 2 time Grey Cup champion (1988, 90)

Travis Bond – 28 games in 2 seasons (2016-17), divisional and CFL all-star (2016) and CFLPA all-star (2017), team nominee Most Outstanding Offensive Lineman (2016)

Buddy Brown – 53 games in 4 seasons (1975-78), 2 time divisional all-star (1976, 77)

Larry Butler – 32 games in 2 seasons (1980-81), 2 time divisional all-star (1980, 81) and 2 time CFL all-star (1980, 81), CFL Most Outstanding Offensive Lineman (1981)

Bill Ceretti – 71 games in 16 seasons (1931-41, 45-49), 3 time divisional all-star (1938, 40, 46), 8 Grey Cup appearances (1935, 37-39, 41, 45-47), 3 time Grey Cup champion (1935, 39, 41), referred to by Vince Leah as “one of the finest Canadian-born linemen in the history of the game”, nicknamed “Red Dog” because of his card-playing skills

Ed Kotowich – 99 games in 7 seasons (1955-61), divisional all-star (1959), 4 Grey Cup appearances (1957-59, 61), 3 time Grey Cup champion (1958, 59, 61), after retirement, was a St. Boniface alderman from 1968-77, Winnipeg Rods asst. coach as well as involvement in Winakwa and Windsor Park football programs, multiple community board positions, the club’s “Good Guy” award for “football ability, team camaraderie, and extraordinary effort off the field” is named in his honour

Brendan LaBatte – 69 games in 4 seasons (2008-11), 3 time divisional all-star (2009-11), CFL and CFLPA all-star (2011), team nominee for Outstanding Rookie (2008), 3 time team nominee Most Outstanding Offensive Lineman (2009-11), Grey Cup appearances (2011)

Les Lear – 30 games in 7 seasons (1937-43), divisional all-star (1941), 6 Grey Cup appearances (1937-39, 41-43), 2 time Grey Cup champion (1939, 41), CFL Hall of Fame, became the first Canadian trained player to play in the NFL, was head coach of the undefeated 1948 Calgary Stampeder Grey Cup championship squad

Bob Lueck – 29 games in 2 seasons (1971-72), 2 time divisional all-star (1971, 72) and CFL all-star (1972)

Brett MacNeil – 151 games in 10 seasons (1992-97, 1999-2002), divisional all-star (2001) and CFL all-star (2001), 3 Grey Cup appearances (1992, 93, 01)

Lou Mogul – 57 games in 11 seasons (1932-42), 2 time divisional all-star (1937, 41), 6 Grey Cup appearances (1935, 37-39, 41, 42), 3 time Grey Cup champion (1935, 39, 41)

Steve Patrick – 172 games in 13 seasons (1952-64), 2 time divisional all-star (1958, 59), team nominee Most Outstanding Lineman (1958), team nominee Most Outstanding Canadian (1959), 6 Grey Cup appearances (1953, 57-59, 61, 62), 4 time Grey Cup champion (1958, 59, 61, 62), member of Manitoba Legislative Assembly from 1962-77, sons Steve Jr. and James played in the NHL, grandson Nolan currently in the NHL, and daughter Tara played university volleyball

Cornel Piper – 163 games in 11 seasons (1957-67), 2 time divisional all-star (1960, 61), 6 Grey Cup appearances (1957-59, 61, 62, 65), 4 time Grey Cup champion (1958, 59, 61, 62)

Matt Sheridan – 86 games in 8 seasons (2001-08), 2 time team nominee Most Outstanding Offensive Lineman (2004, 05), 2 Grey Cup appearances (2001, 07)

Sherwyn Thorson – 91 games in 7 seasons (1962-67), divisional all-star (1962), 2 Grey Cup appearances (1962, 65), Grey Cup champion (1962)

Edited by TrueBlue4ever

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Nick Bastaja was a straight up beauty... Beast up the gut. I had a lot of love for Matty Sheridan as well. In a position where you're essentially looking for a bar room brawler, that's a guy you want having your back... 

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2 hours ago, Noeller said:

Nick Bastaja was a straight up beauty... Beast up the gut. I had a lot of love for Matty Sheridan as well. In a position where you're essentially looking for a bar room brawler, that's a guy you want having your back... 

I had overlooked Sheridan in making my list. He was twice nominated as the Bombers best o-lineman, so I have added him here, despite his lack of all-star nods. Injuries caught up with him, and after sitting for a year on injured reserve he was let go. Sadly, he was quite bitter in his departure and threw the Bombers medical staff under the bus. Signed with Calgary but retired a couple of months later before ever suiting up.

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9 minutes ago, TrueBlue4ever said:

112 games in 8 seasons (1970-77), no all-star noms or award recognition, outshone by Bill Frank in that era. 

I thought he was an all star at least once. He was a solid player. You don't play 7 seasons with one team if you aren't good. But others were all stars so they deserve to be there instead.

 

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One man's take:

One of the more anonymous positions on the field, many of these nominees never got the "name" recognition of their brethren, but provided solid and steady play and paved the way for some great running backs in their time, and in some cases displayed great durability. Working alphabetically:

Bastaja - the most decorated of the guards with 6 divisional and 2 league all-star nods, and only one of two Bomber guards to win the Schenley for outstanding lineman in the CFL. Along with Black, Bonk and Walby, was part of a ridiculously strong o-line in the mid-80's that helped Willard Reaves become a star.

Black - an ironman with a bit of a nasty streak, he anchored the line throughout almost all of the team's last great sustained run of excellence.

Bond - two great years, but left for greener pastures (both in terms of money and uniform colour) and doesn't have the mileage of some other candidates

Brown - effective in his half decade here, but his efforts could not translate into team success 

Butler - the other Schenley winner in the group, he was dominant in his time here, and also in his other league stops (not to be factored in) and considered one of the best linemen in the CFL, regardless of position. Only his smaller sample size in Winnipeg keeps him from top two consideration

Ceretti - part of the original Bomber dynasty in the 1930's-40's and the most tenured candidate with 16 seasons under his belt, and if Vince Leah ranks you among the best ever, that's heady praise

Kotowich - not sure if you want an o-lineman who has a "nice guy" award named after him, but his legacy in this city is very strong indeed

LaBatte - the best lineman the Bombers had during his time here, and it took a while to recover once he left via free agency. Loses points for ditching us for the 'Riders.

Lear - enjoyed the first taste of Bomber Grey Cup success, and made his name later as an NFLer and Stamps head coach in that perfect 1948 season.

Lueck - two good seasons, but too small a sample size to contend here

Mogul - in the group with Lear and Ceretti in the 30's, albeit less feted than the other 2

Patrick - a big part of the 50's-60's dynasty teams, playing both ways, and logged more games than any other candidate. Also won more Grey Cups than any other, blocked for Leo Lewis, and the only lineman in this group to get an Outstanding Canadian nom. His civic legacy and family tree put him a level above for me.

Piper - Patrick's partner, matched his all-star numbers, but was never chosen as the team's best lineman like his teammate was

Sheridan - the guy you'd most want on your side in a barroom brawl, no all-star nods, injuries and a sour departure hurt his standing

Thorson - picked up the slack for Patrick and Piper when they retired, but could never reach the same level of team success they had

In the end, it's Bastaja's awards and Patrick's family legend that clinch it for me. They are my top 2.

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Bastaja & Black for me. I don't think that civic volunteering or having 2 sons who played in the NHL  should be part of picking one player over another. Players should be judged only by their accomplishments on the field to keep it a level playing field  I'm not criticizing you TB4 as you're free to use whatever criteria you like. Just my opinion. 

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7 hours ago, Noeller said:

Nick Bastaja was a straight up beauty... Beast up the gut. I had a lot of love for Matty Sheridan as well. In a position where you're essentially looking for a bar room brawler, that's a guy you want having your back... 

1983 JOGO CFL Limited #70 Nick Bastaja Front

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2 hours ago, SpeedFlex27 said:

Bastaja & Black for me. I don't think that civic volunteering or having 2 sons who played in the NHL  should be part of picking one player over another. Players should be judged only by their accomplishments on the field to keep it a level playing field  I'm not criticizing you TB4 as you're free to use whatever criteria you like. Just my opinion. 

Patrick earns my vote based on his play and his success. He and Frank Rigney paved the way for Leo Lewis to weave his magic. And if Kenny Ploen’s 4 Grey Cups make him the all-timer at QB over more physically  gifted  pivots (as I suspect it deservedly might), then those 4 rings Patrick has count for a lot too. His genetic dynasty is just an added bonus for me. Honestly, no wrong choice with Black, Ceretti, LaBatte, or Butler on pure talent either pairing up with Bastaja, who was top of the heap IMO. 

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1 hour ago, TrueBlue4ever said:

Patrick earns my vote based on his play and his success. He and Frank Rigney paved the way for Leo Lewis to weave his magic. And if Kenny Ploen’s 4 Grey Cups make him the all-timer at QB over more physically  gifted  pivots (as I suspect it deservedly might), then those 4 rings Patrick has count for a lot too. His genetic dynasty is just an added bonus for me. Honestly, no wrong choice with Black, Ceretti, LaBatte, or Butler on pure talent either pairing up with Bastaja, who was top of the heap IMO. 

Well, I think Ken was an athletic qb as this OT run to win the 1961 Grey Cup will attest. As physically gifted as any qb of his day. Faked the 2 Ti Cat defenders out of their shorts & grasping at air. He ran a Split T offense with the Bombers which meant 3 running backs & 2 TE's with just a flanker & a split end to throw to. It was a run first offense.  Ploen was never allowed to really show off his accuracy & arm strength under Bud Grant's offensive system. . 

 

 

Edited by SpeedFlex27

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3 hours ago, TrueBlue4ever said:

The guy we should have paid a lot more money to so we didn’t lose him to free agency and cripple our line for 5 years. 

He knocked up his girlfriend and  nothing we could do was going to keep him. Get over it and move on. 

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Here are some games played details for the players who played in the 1930's & 1940's

Bill Ceretti missed the 1942 season with a broken wrist

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Les Lear's 1937 regular season lasted 1 play. He entered the game to start the 2nd quarter and he was ejected for fighting.

y4mT9l06gTIJxmwHk3k5jTvmBciNZCxUyrJzv7b4

Lou Mogul was primarily a middle wing (tackle) during his career.

y4m1nNJM84AW9eZ64kPZ5GxeVz2vph4w_b2MFtDl

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