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SpeedFlex27

Around the League: 2019 Off Season

Rich

For minor off-season non-Bomber CFL news.  Any significant stories or news that is likely to generate significant discussion may have its own thread created. General Bomber news can be found here.

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6 hours ago, Mark H. said:

The best Anericans usually make as much or more than the Canadians - Stanley Bryant comes to mind. But I highly doubt any American RB makes more than Andrew Harris. 

Regardless of passport, how many American RB in the league would you take over Harris? His first bombers contract was rumored to be in the 175-200 range, not sure about his extension.  Honestly I can't see paying any American RB near that number, but with how important Harris (and his passport) are to the team, he's worth it.  No question quality NI make a nice premium over imports of the same position

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Lost in the talk of the upcoming CFL Combine in Toronto:

MARCH 20 - 22 - RULES COMMITTEE & FOOTBALL OPERATIONS COMMITTEE MEETINGS

These meetings will be held in Toronto, Ontario.

👁‍🗨 High on their list of discussions will be the how to offset the berating of officials by players and Coaches. There was an escalation over the last 2 seasons and there are plans in place to deter further comments. They will call this new directive “Skip the Dissing” 😀

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1 hour ago, 17to85 said:

I have an idea! STOP MAKING ******* STUPID CALL!

You obviously have never referred before...or else if you did, you were perfect. Yes, the refs in the CFL do get it wrong sometimes...at times even ***** stupid calls. But heh, NFL refs make some really bad calls and they are full time. 

If I'm a player, I'd feel like cussing out a ref sometimes too, but I'd expect a penalty for it.

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4 hours ago, Throw Long Bannatyne said:

BC absolutely paid Chungh more than he's worth, that's their problem.

 When you couple that with Reilly's big contract, and a few other salaries like Elimimian's...something has to give??

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12 hours ago, brett_c_b said:

At the time of the signing it was reported as being $190,000 in the Sun

I thought he was re-signed after that one to an extension

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Oh joy oh joy. I will be watching the circuses in Regina, Montreal and Vancouver this season. It does worry me. A lot. Schadenfreude is fun but this is damned close to overload, but the CFL always seems to muddle through.

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16 hours ago, Tracker said:

Oh joy oh joy. I will be watching the circuses in Regina, Montreal and Vancouver this season. It does worry me. A lot. Schadenfreude is fun but this is damned close to overload, but the CFL always seems to muddle through.

What’s the circus in Vancouver 

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22 minutes ago, Floyd said:

What’s the circus in Vancouver 

Overpaying their star players to the extent where there are table scraps for everyone else and their new and shiny GM blowing up pretty much the whole team to put his mark on it. He could have just peed on the corners of his desk.

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BC is going to be interesting...a lot of change there and some high powered (priced) signings, but at the expense of depth and most likely on defence...so they will be a hit or miss team...probably need to score 30 points or more a game just to have a chance to win, not a recipe for success by any means and one or two major injuries to a top tier guy, and they are hooped

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45 minutes ago, Booch said:

BC is going to be interesting...a lot of change there and some high powered (priced) signings, but at the expense of depth and most likely on defence...so they will be a hit or miss team...probably need to score 30 points or more a game just to have a chance to win, not a recipe for success by any means and one or two major injuries to a top tier guy, and they are hooped

I think they're going to dominate the first 3rd/half of the season. But won't have the same success later in the year. 

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https://www.tsn.ca/a-solution-to-the-cfl-2-0-roster-question-1.1276955

The most mysterious element to the ongoing Canadian Football League labour talks is the question of how the rosters will have to adjust to accommodate the incoming recruitment of players from around world.

In what has been tabbed CFL 2.0 by commissioner Randy Ambrosie, the league sees a future with players from countries like Mexico, Germany, Italy and France playing in the league. The idea is to diversify the league with an international flavour, in the hopes of creating broadcast audiences in the countries these players come from.

In January, the CFL held a combine and draft in Mexico City. This upcoming weekend's annual CFL Combine for draft-eligible Canadian players in Toronto will include 18 European players who've been invited to participate.

But what no one understands yet – and what must be determined during the current CBA talks – is how these players will get onto a roster and how they will fit in with the CFL’s current ratio of Canadians to Americans.

Will they have to earn their way onto the field or will they have starting spots designated for them? How do you make that work without someone surrendering some precious ground, like the 21 roster spots presently dedicated exclusively for Canadians?

These are complicated questions with difficult answers. Surely you can’t add such a dynamic element to your sport without there being some significant changes to the construction of rosters. But it’s important that the league gets this right so that the integration of international players doesn’t disturb the integrity of the sport.

So here’s a solution that would make sense and allow international players to become part of the CFL when they are ready to do so, without drastically changing the role of Canadians in the game.

The CFL should drop the minimum number of Canadians on every team from 21 to 15, opening up six spots on every roster for which global players can compete. The reality is Canadians would retain most of those spots. But if a player from Germany or France can legitimately beat out a Canadian for one of those six spots, he should be on the roster.

If there are no global players worthy of beating out Canadians, then the number of Canadians on every team would remain the same – 21. But this roster tweak opens the door for global players to be part of the CFL when they are ready and allows Canadians to compete to keep their jobs.

The requirement for seven Canadian starters per team should be changed to Canadian or global players, giving players from around the world the same opportunity to start that Canadians have, providing they are good enough to be on a roster.

Teams would have an incentive to identify and develop talent from around the world as there would be significant value in a global player who is good enough to start.

There have been suggestions that the league could mandate that two of the seven starting Canadian roles must go to global players. But such a move, were it implemented right away, would result in 18 starters across the league’s nine teams next season, most or all of whom wouldn’t be as good as anyone else on the field.

That’s depleting the product and providing global players a handout.

Making them compete with Canadians for one of six open spots on each team would allow the CFL to gradually become more international over time as players from around the world are able to legitimately vie for jobs. Until they can, the league would – and should – remain Canadian and American.

The end result over time would be fewer Canadian players in the CFL as the talent pool from around the world grows and improves. In this sense, it’s no different than there being a lower percentage of Canadians in the NHL now than there was before the arrival of players from Europe.

There are still a lot of Canadians in the NHL, just as there will always be a lot of Canadians in the CFL under this model.

Ambrosie is fond of drawing comparisons to other leagues and pointing to the positives when international players arrived, be it the dawn of Yao Ming in the NBA or the early trickle of NHL players from Europe. But those players, and every other international player in the NBA or NHL, earned their way into the game.

That needs to happen in the CFL, which is why global players must be forced to compete with Canadians to be part of a team, not handed a job despite being inferior to players groomed in Canada.

It’s inevitable that some kind of change is coming. The CFL can’t introduce a bold new vision and expect everything else to remain the same.

But it needs to happen gradually, making sure international players can join this league once they are ready and able, while protecting the integrity of the sport along the way

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1 hour ago, JCon said:

Carter is a circus unto himself. 

I'm betting that Carter will not last the year with the Lions. He is a ****-magnet and cannot shut his mouth if his life depends on it- and his CFL career does.

Edited by Tracker

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basically....I was not smart enough, or good enough to translate the two different games...in a nut shell

so when he flops down there and shows he is average at best..then what?..His CFL exposure ruined his years and years of training?...what a doucher

Hasn't seemed to effect many many guys before him..and many with lesser hype succeed and flourish

Edited by Booch

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1 hour ago, Noeller said:

https://www.tsn.ca/a-solution-to-the-cfl-2-0-roster-question-1.1276955

The most mysterious element to the ongoing Canadian Football League labour talks is the question of how the rosters will have to adjust to accommodate the incoming recruitment of players from around world.

In what has been tabbed CFL 2.0 by commissioner Randy Ambrosie, the league sees a future with players from countries like Mexico, Germany, Italy and France playing in the league. The idea is to diversify the league with an international flavour, in the hopes of creating broadcast audiences in the countries these players come from.

In January, the CFL held a combine and draft in Mexico City. This upcoming weekend's annual CFL Combine for draft-eligible Canadian players in Toronto will include 18 European players who've been invited to participate.

But what no one understands yet – and what must be determined during the current CBA talks – is how these players will get onto a roster and how they will fit in with the CFL’s current ratio of Canadians to Americans.

Will they have to earn their way onto the field or will they have starting spots designated for them? How do you make that work without someone surrendering some precious ground, like the 21 roster spots presently dedicated exclusively for Canadians?

These are complicated questions with difficult answers. Surely you can’t add such a dynamic element to your sport without there being some significant changes to the construction of rosters. But it’s important that the league gets this right so that the integration of international players doesn’t disturb the integrity of the sport.

So here’s a solution that would make sense and allow international players to become part of the CFL when they are ready to do so, without drastically changing the role of Canadians in the game.

The CFL should drop the minimum number of Canadians on every team from 21 to 15, opening up six spots on every roster for which global players can compete. The reality is Canadians would retain most of those spots. But if a player from Germany or France can legitimately beat out a Canadian for one of those six spots, he should be on the roster.

If there are no global players worthy of beating out Canadians, then the number of Canadians on every team would remain the same – 21. But this roster tweak opens the door for global players to be part of the CFL when they are ready and allows Canadians to compete to keep their jobs.

The requirement for seven Canadian starters per team should be changed to Canadian or global players, giving players from around the world the same opportunity to start that Canadians have, providing they are good enough to be on a roster.

Teams would have an incentive to identify and develop talent from around the world as there would be significant value in a global player who is good enough to start.

There have been suggestions that the league could mandate that two of the seven starting Canadian roles must go to global players. But such a move, were it implemented right away, would result in 18 starters across the league’s nine teams next season, most or all of whom wouldn’t be as good as anyone else on the field.

That’s depleting the product and providing global players a handout.

Making them compete with Canadians for one of six open spots on each team would allow the CFL to gradually become more international over time as players from around the world are able to legitimately vie for jobs. Until they can, the league would – and should – remain Canadian and American.

The end result over time would be fewer Canadian players in the CFL as the talent pool from around the world grows and improves. In this sense, it’s no different than there being a lower percentage of Canadians in the NHL now than there was before the arrival of players from Europe.

There are still a lot of Canadians in the NHL, just as there will always be a lot of Canadians in the CFL under this model.

Ambrosie is fond of drawing comparisons to other leagues and pointing to the positives when international players arrived, be it the dawn of Yao Ming in the NBA or the early trickle of NHL players from Europe. But those players, and every other international player in the NBA or NHL, earned their way into the game.

That needs to happen in the CFL, which is why global players must be forced to compete with Canadians to be part of a team, not handed a job despite being inferior to players groomed in Canada.

It’s inevitable that some kind of change is coming. The CFL can’t introduce a bold new vision and expect everything else to remain the same.

But it needs to happen gradually, making sure international players can join this league once they are ready and able, while protecting the integrity of the sport along the way

Decent proposal by Naylor, allows the global players to vie for the seven ratio spots reserved for Natls., gives them the opportunity to compete but does not guarantee them a spot on the roster.  I like that strategy as it doesn't have an immediate impact on the game.

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